Volunteering FAQs

Updated: 4/28/2017

1) Where is the check for the Intel Involved hours I submitted?
2) How do I submit Intel Involved hours?
3) How can I verify the Intel Involved hours I have submitted?
4) What is required of a non-profit organization to determine its eligibility under the Intel Involved Matching Grant Program?
5) My non-profit organization is a 501(c)3 organization but it’s still not eligible. Why?
6) Can my volunteer hours for 501(c)(3) that are NOT public charities count as Intel Involved hours?
7) How can I determine if my 501(c)(3) NON-Public Charity organization has an associated “Friends of…” public charity?
8) What are the requirements for posting a volunteer opportunity on the IRO website?
9) How can an Intel retiree post a volunteer opportunity that meets the requirements?
10) Can an organization request posting of volunteer opportunities?
11) Will an Intel Involved payout go to the local chapter of an eligible National Organization?

 

1) Where is the check for the Intel Involved hours I submitted?

  • Initial group of payout checks for Intel Involved hours are normally sent out in the 2nd quarter of the year AFTER they were submitted.
  • Additional payout checks for submitted Intel Involved hours are batched up and sent as organizations and hours are vetted for compliance to the Intel Involved program requirements. This typically happens in the Fall and at years end after the initial payout checks are sent.
  • Checks are sent out by to the eligible 501(c)3 non-profits specified on the form you used to submit your Intel Involved hours.
  • A payout report is compiled after the initial batch of checks are sent and IRO typically receive a copy around the middle of May.
    • This spread sheet report is posted for a limited time on the IRO website and announced in the monthly News Flash, the IRO website, and the closed IRO Facebook page.
    • If the non-profit you volunteered for has NOT received a check by the end of June, Check this payout report to see if a check was mailed and where it was mailed to.
  • The check may have been sent, but the organization did not realize they had received an Intel Involved check for the volunteer hours you had submitted or it may have been sent to an old address or to the National Chapter that is eligible for the Intel Involved program.
    • If the non-profit was NOT listed in the currently posted payout report, you will need to email a request to Intel, volunteers@intel.com, asking about the status of the expected payout.
    • The most common reason is the organization has not completed the required paperwork affirming their compliance with Intel’s non-discrimination policy.
    • If you do NOT receive a reply within 2 weeks from Intel please forward the email to the retiree mailbox, intelretiree@gmail.com, and we will help you track down the status of the payout.

2) How do I submit Intel Involved hours?

3) How can I verify the Intel Involved hours I have submitted?

  • You should receive an email confirmation from Intel within a few days after submitting Intel Involved volunteer hours.
  • For any specific questions about hours submitted, email these questions to retiree.volunteers@intel.com. If you still have issues with your submitted hours, then send them to the IRO mailbox, intelretiree@gmail.com

4) What is required of a non-profit organization to determine its eligibility under the Intel Involved Matching Grant Program?

  • US organizations must be designated a tax-exempt IRS Section 501(c)(3) public charity as defined by the IRS tax code, provide a statement of the organization’s mission, and verify compliance with Intel’s non-discrimination policy.
  • Non-US organizations must submit an Intel Involved Matching Grant application that is reviewed to determine that it is equivalent to a 501(c)3 public charity as defined by the IRS.
  • All organizations must also verify that they comply with the Intel’s non-discrimination policy.

5) My non-profit organization is a 501(c)3 organization but it’s still not eligible. Why?

  • Non-profit organizations must be 501(c)3 PUBLIC CHARITIES to be eligible for a matching grant for the Foundation. Many organizations are non-profit, that is, they are generally exempt from paying income tax. Trade associations, chambers of commerce, and fraternal organizations are examples of organizations that are tax-exempt charities. However, donations to these types of organizations are generally not tax deductible to the donor and are not eligible of the Intel Involved program.

6) Can my volunteer hours for 501(c)(3) that are NOT public charities count as Intel Involved hours?

  • Many 501(c)(3) organizations such as libraries, parks, museums, search & rescue teams, have a supporting “Friends of …”public charity that passes along donated funds to their associated non-public charity (and non-profit) organization. Volunteer hours submitted to these “Friends of …” organizations may qualify as Intel Involve hours.

7) How can I determine if my 501(c)(3) NON-Public Charity organization has an associated “Friends of…” public charity?

  • You can search the IRS database at http://apps.irs.gov/app/eos/ by name (or part of a name), city, state. For example, if you volunteered time at the Chandler Public Library, you could search on Library for Name, Chandler for City and AZ for the State. That query would return the Friends of Chandler Public Library Inc. and provide the organization’s EIN as well as their Deductibility Status.
  • If the status is PC, they are a public charity and are potentially eligible for the Intel Involved Matching Grant Program. Use the provided EIN to submit your hours to Intel. If not already eligible, the organization will be contacted and vetted to determine their Intel Involved eligibility.

8) What are the requirements for posting a volunteer opportunity on the IRO website?

  • Opportunity qualifies for an Intel Involved matching grant.
  • The opportunity comes from Intel or from an Intel retiree who supports the opportunity.
  • An Intel or retiree contact is posted for the opportunity.  This person agrees to answer questions about the opportunity and to help interested retirees engage.  Ideally the person works or volunteers for the organization and personally supports it.
  • The volunteer opportunity fits the skill and interests of Intel retirees.

9) How can an Intel retiree post a volunteer opportunity that meets the requirements?

  • A draft of the posting is provided to the chair of the Volunteer Committee following the general format of the currently posted opportunities.  The chair will suggest any changes and ensure the posting requirements are met before passing the opportunity to the website committee for posting.

10) Can an organization request posting of volunteer opportunities?

  • An organization contacting the Intel Retiree Organization with a request to post a volunteer opportunity needs to have an Intel retiree sponsor or have a current Intel employee who is actively backing the organization before the opportunity is posted on the website.  The volunteer committee will consider such requests and help find a sponsor if the opportunity meets the requirements and the committee believes it will be of interest to Intel retirees.

11) Will an Intel Involved payout go to the local chapter of an eligible National Organization?

  • This varies from org to org depending on the chartering EIN.  Some local chapters have their own EINs, some are part of parent organizations. The parent can claim the local chapters and this allows them to be set up separately in the system(s) but the checks usually still go to the parent who is ultimately responsible for dispersing to chapters.
  • Intel retirees may need to work with the local chapter and parent organization for the local chapter to receive the Intel Involved payout for the hours they had submitted.

Comments are closed.